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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Edmond, OK
    Posts
    2,508

    Default Living in the country

    I'm sure there are at least a few of you that live out in the country. Our goal is to do the same within the next 6-18 months, depending upon what we can work out. What are some things that you would suggest considering, lessons learned, etc after living in the country for a while? I'm wanting to ensure I get some feedback from folks that have done it to see if there were things they overlooked prior to making the move and if there are things they would have done differently.

  2. #2

    Default

    I would have done it sooner!
    2007 Moomba Outback
    Why Not? Play Hard! Get WET.....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Flowery Branch Georgia
    Posts
    2,338

    Default

    Look for a place with as few restrictions as possible . Preferably not within a city limit with as many acres as you can afford. Close proximity to a lake is a bonus.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Clayton NC
    Posts
    171

    Default

    If you work on your car or like to have a clean car/boat don't live on a dirt road. Make sure if you have neighbors that they good people- they can make or break you fortress of solitude.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    Wow, Okie...selling the boat and moving to the country. Life happens to everyone. I've thought about selling mine since it hasn't been run in over a year. We moved to the country too but compared to the tows others are making to their home lakes it's not really that far. I'm halfway between Austin & San Antonio now instead of 2 miles from Lake Travis. Canyon Lake is alot closer now than it was before at least.

    I can't think of anything we would have done differently or that we overlooked but here's a few considerations. You may have thought of them already.

    Are you going to build a house or buy one? Buying existing in the country often means smaller and not very efficient. If you're going to build then buy the land as soon as you find it. Around Austin lots of people are moving to the country so land prices are only going up. We bought the land about 2 years before we settled on a builder and plans.

    Country also usually means septic system and either a well or rain water. Wells work fine in many areas but you don't have a storage tank. If the well goes dry you have to dig deeper. Rain water collection comes with a storage tank. If a drought gets bad enough you only need to buy water which is a heck of a lot cheaper than drilling again. With more people moving to the country and sucking up the water, having a well go dry made us nervous.

    Unrestricted is the way to go like Michael said.

    Storage is very important. You'll want extra fridge and freezer in the house as well as large pantry. Going to the store can be a hassle. Having freezer space for taking a few deer is good.

    Driveways are expensive but undeveloped land is alot cheaper than paying a developer who did all of that stuff plus their markup.

    Wood burning stoves are nice to have too.

    Good luck and have fun. I can't bear the idea of moving back into a neighborhood.

    PS...if you don't have a chainsaw add it to your Christmas list
    Last edited by Salty87; 12-17-2014 at 03:12 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Edmond, OK
    Posts
    2,508

    Default

    Some good thoughts. At this point we are leaning towards resale and have actually found one place that is a gem...it may work out...we'll see. I would definitely like having rainwater collection and it has been on my list for quite some time now. Just need the right situation to be able to make it work and out in the country would definitely do it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Edmond, OK
    Posts
    2,508

    Default

    Any thoughts on modular home units versus stick built?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Clark, CO.
    Posts
    592

    Default

    Being a carpenter it's almost impossible to pick modular over stick.
    When designing a house i first would look at functionality and efficiency first. I live where snow loads and ice damns are a constant issue if the house is built poorly. I doubt you have those problems where you live but the lessons of insulation still apply.
    A lot of people up here are using wood fired boilers, I prefer a wood burning stove.
    Rain collection systems work well if you get rain but make sure the plastic storage tanks are in your crawl space as they tend to crush easily when buried.
    Most important is Toy storage......How ever much you think you need, double it and you will still fill it.
    Function before fashion!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    2,150

    Default

    In theory, modular should be better built but I have no experience. A factory production line should have more uniform components with tighter tolerances than a crew of workers likely building a floor plan they haven't built before...often as quickly as possible so they can move on to the next job. Builders often can't keep a close enough eye on their subs.

    Here's another option. Up-front costs are higher but reduced heating/cooling as well as significantly reduced maintenance costs are significant.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulating_concrete_form

  10. #10

    Default

    If you hire people worthy of their trade quality isn't a problem. Anyone can build a plain box which is what modular homes typically are. I am also a carpenter and typically do interior trim carpentry but I have done plenty of framing also. Along with remodeling work on modular houses. There is nothing in a modular house that is superior to a stick framed house. To think that people working on a custom house would cut corners and that a factory wouldn't is naive. Having a house built is the same as anything else you get what you pay for. If you want it as cheap as possible that's what you're going to get.
    Last edited by ssa; 12-19-2014 at 07:20 PM.
    1995 Supra Sunsport 454

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